Physician Education and Scholarship Center

International Medical Education

International medical schools attract students in large numbers, most of them U.S. or Canadian citizens, who were rejected admission to U.S. medical schools due to low MCAT scores, low GPA, or a combination of both (Offshore Medical Schools…-WES). There is a 44% acceptance rate into medical schools in the United States which means over 50% of applicants cannot get in. There are opportunities to attend medical schools in the Caribbean which follow the United States medical school curriculum and give the students opportunity to return to the U.S. and undergo their clinical rotations.

The first set of these medical schools were established in the late 1970’s and have since trained many U.S. and Canadian students. There are 37 Caribbean medical schools which primarily train students from the United States and Canada who intend to return home for residency and clinical practice after graduation. In these schools, the basic sciences are completed in the Caribbean while clinical clerkships are completed at hospitals in the United States.




Although opportunities exist to attend medical school in the Caribbean, it must also be emphasized that extensive research should be done regarding the school you or your child plan to attend.




There have been many cases of students who arrived at some schools only to realize that the schools and areas are not reflective of the images shown online and at seminars. So here comes the first step in choosing a school for you or your child:

 

YOU MUST TRAVEL TO THE SCHOOL YOU INTEND TO SEND YOUR CHILD
TO SEE IF THEY ARE ALL THEY CLAIM TO BE!

 

The next step is to ask questions. Below are questions you should ask during the seminars and/or during your visit:

Who is the school accredited by?

Do you offer housing for students?

Do you offer financial aid or loan options?

What laboratories do you have and are they well equipped?

What is your student to teacher ratio?

What is your first time USMLE board pass rate?

Is there a wait time between Clinical rotations?

What is the percentage of graduates who get accepted into residency?




Many also ask this question, “Why does tuition cost $6000 dollars and the others cost $20,000 dollars even though these medical schools are all in the Caribbean?”




 


Some schools cost more for the following reasons

  • Excellent academic faculty

  • Good student to teacher ratio

  • Clinical rotations at teaching hospitals in the United States

  • Well-equipped laboratories
  • Excellent administrative support

 

 
Provided below is a link to Caribbean Medical Schools



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