Physician Education and Scholarship Center

Residency

Upon completion of medical school you must undergo residency training in order to be licensed to practice in the United States. Residency involves getting specific training in a specialty and is typically the last step in training to become a physician. During residency training you will be paid, because it is a job, although you are still under supervision. It is very demanding with residents routinely working up to 80 hours a week.

Graduates of both allopathic and osteopathic medical schools are eligible to apply to these residency programs. To get into a residency training program, you need to take the United States Medical Licensure Examination (USMLE). There are 3 steps but 4 exams and they are:

Step 1 - Assesses whether you understand and can apply important concepts of the sciences basic to the practice of medicine. This exam emphasizes principles and mechanisms underlying health, disease, and modes of therapy. It is usually taken at the end of your second year in medical school before you begin Clinical studies.

Step 2 Clinical Knowledge - assesses whether you can apply medical knowledge, skills, and understanding of clinical science essential for the provision of patient care under supervision and includes emphasis on health promotion and disease prevention. This exam is usually taken in the fourth year of medical school.

Step 2 Clinical Skills - assessment assesses the ability of examinees to apply medical knowledge, skills, and understanding of clinical science essential for the provision of patient care under supervision, and includes emphasis on health promotion and disease prevention. This exam is usually taken in the fourth year of medical school.

Step 3 - assesses whether you can apply medical knowledge and understanding of biomedical and clinical science essential for the unsupervised practice of medicine, with emphasis on patient management in ambulatory settings. This is exam is typically taken at the end of the first year of residency. 

Source: www.usmle.org

While preparing for these exams it is important that you use the study guidelines and question banks. It is also necessary that you prepare maximally to avoid having to repeat the exam as this diminishes your chances of getting a position as there is a fierce competition for the available residency spots.

To get accepted into a residency training program it is required that you take USMLE Steps 1 and 2, and then the Step 3 typically after your first year of residency.

Sometimes graduates of international medical schools which include Caribbean medical schools take Step 3 earlier during the residency application season so as to increase their chances of securing a residency training position.


To get more information on getting into residency CLICK HERE.
(getting into residency seminar link)


Some specialties which offer residency training positions include:

Family medicine is the total health care of the individual and the family, and is trained to diagnose and treat a wide variety of ailments in patients of all ages.

General surgery manages a broad spectrum of surgical conditions affecting almost any area of the body. The surgeon establishes the diagnosis and provides the preoperative, operative, and post-operative care to surgical patients.

In Internal medicine, the internist provides long-term, comprehensive care in the office and the hospital, managing both common and complex illness of adolescents, adults, and the elderly.

In neurology there is specialization in the diagnosis and treatment of all types of disease or impaired function of the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves, muscles, and autonomic nervous system, as well as the blood vessels that relate to these structures.


Graduates of international medical schools typically apply to residency training programs in Internal medicine, Family medicine, Pediatrics and Psychiatry because these typically offer more positions and are not typically favored by graduates of US medical schools. Specialties in any surgical field such as ophthalmology, neurosurgery and plastic surgery are very competitive and are highly looked upon by graduates of US medical schools.

To view more specialties and their definitions please visit: http://intermountainhealthcare.org/providers/specialties.html

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